Azure Ubuntu and WordPress – Part 1

This is part 1 of a 4 part mini series “How To” for configuring WordPress on Ubuntu which is hosted in Microsoft Azure.

The 4 Parts are broken in to the following sections:

Part 1 – Deploying Ubuntu on Microsoft Azure
Part 2 – Configuring LAMP on Ubuntu
Part 3 – Install and Configuring WordPress on Ubuntu
Part 4 – Trouble shooting the common issues

So, with out further a do lets get cracking on Part 1 which is:

Deploying Ubuntu on Microsoft Azure

With Azure there were 2 options for to deploy WordPress

  1. Use one of the pre-built WordPress services from the Azure Market Place
  2. Deploy my own Ubuntu Server in Azure and configure WordPress on there.

As you will see there are a “few” options in the Azure Market Place for WordPress if you decide t go down the “prebuilt” route:

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However I decided to deploy my own Ubuntu Server in Azure and build it myself from there.

Log in to https://portal.azure.com and add a new compute resource:

I created a Server running Ubuntu 16.04:

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I then set the basic info in the Azure Portal:

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Then, I selected the VM Size, there are LOADS of sizes to choose from ranging from about £7 per month to £5,500. Needless to say as I was running Ubuntu one of the cheaper plans would be more than sufficient.

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Once I’d selected the size I then checked over the settings and left them all as they were as for me they were fine.

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Once I was happy with the summary I click on the Purchase option to build the VM.

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The only change I needed to do once the VM had been created was to edit the Network Security Group (NSG) to allow access via port 80 to the server so you can browse to it form the internet:

Select networking:

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Then click on Add Inbound:

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Select the HTTP service from the service drop down list and then click on ok

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That’s it, the Ubuntu Server now up and running ready to receive web and HTTP traffic. To increase security you could look at locking down SSH to only permitted IP Addresses if you’d prefer.

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